Canadian-First Nations relations

The 2013 Narrm Oration: Taiaiake Alfred

Producer
The University of Melbourne
Year

The 2013 Narrm Oration, "Being and becoming Indigenous: Resurgence against contemporary colonialism", was delivered by Professor Taiaiake Alfred on 28 November.

Professor Alfred is the founding Director of the Indigenous Governance Program at the University of Victoria in British Columbia, Canada. He specializes in traditions of governance, decolonization strategies, and land based cultural restoration.

The Narrm Oration has been hosted annually by Murrup Barak, Melbourne Institute for Indigenous Development at The University of Melbourne with the support of Rio Tinto Australia since 2009.

Native Nations
Resource Type
Citation

"The 2013 Narrm Oration: Taiaiake Alfred." Murrup Barak, Melbourne Institute for Indigenous Development at The University of Melbourne. The University of Melbourne. Parkville, Victoria. November 28, 2013. Video. (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VwJNy-B3lPA, accessed January 6, 2014)

The Harvard Project on American Indian Economic Development and its Application to Canadian Aboriginal Business

Producer
Simon Fraser University Beedie School of Business
Year

This lecture is part of a course Stephen Cornell is teaching in Simon Fraser University's Executive MBA in Aboriginal Business and Leadership program. A panel of three joined Dr. Cornell in a discussion about the building of First Nation economies and the role citizen entrepreneurship can play in that process: Dr. Sophie Pierre, Chief Commissioner of the B.C. Treaty Commission; Lori Simcox, Senior Manager, Tsleil Waututh Nation Economic Development; and Dr. Doug McArthur, Simon Fraser University School of Public Policy.

Resource Type
Citation

Cornell, Stephen, Doug McArthur, Sophie Pierre, and Lori Simcox. "The Harvard Project on American Indian Economic Development and its Application to Canadian Aboriginal Business." Executive MBA in Aboriginal Business and Leadership program. Burnaby, British Columbia. Presentation. (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b11QeZqizK4, accessed October 18, 2013)

Cigarette smuggling and the Akwesasne Mohawk Reserve

Producer
CBC Television
Year

In this CBC Television news report from 1988, reporter Bruce Garvey takes a long look at the selling -- some call smuggling -- of tax-free cigarettes at the Akwesasne Indian Reserve. Garvey presents this report on the difficulties created by the unique situation of the Akwesasne Indian Reserve, which spans the U.S.-Canada border. Some of the Natives feel that they should be allowed to cross the border without the indignity of having to answer questions and have their cars searched daily; others take advantage of the reserve's sovereignty and exemptions from sales tax by smuggling cigarettes over the border at night and selling them tax-free to Canadians. The cigarette dealers and bingo hall operators on the reserve cause the local Mohawk government more grief than the U.S. and Canadian Federal governments combined...

Resource Type
Citation

CBC Television. "Cigarette smuggling and the Akwesasne Mohawk Reserve." The Journal (Bruce Garvey reporting). Toronto, Ontario. April 11, 1988. Video.  (http://www.cbc.ca/player/play/2401863855, accessed March 22, 2023)

Smoke Traders

Producer
TVO
Year

Told from a Native perspective, "Smoke Traders" looks at the controversy ignited by the Mohawk Nation's involvement in the tobacco trade, raising issues of sovereignty, economic independence and entrepreneurship versus what some see as illegal contraband activity. The multi-million dollar cigarette industry that Mohawks have built has pulled their communities out of third world poverty, but the Canadian government is determined to shut it down. "Smoke Traders" follows Brian, a former tobacco runner from Akwesasne trying to go legit by starting a sustainable energy business, and Robbie, who runs a federally licensed cigarette factory in Kahnawake. But is the tobacco trade a road to independence or criminality for Native people?

Citation

TVO. "Smoke Traders." Toronto, Ontario. October 25, 2012. Film (http://tvo.org/video/documentaries/smoke-traders, accessed August 23, 2013)

Forwarding First Nation Goals Through Enterprise Ownership: The Mikisew Group Of Companies

Year

The Mikisew Group of Companies (Mikisew Group) is the business arm of the Mikisew Cree First Nation (MCFN). Founded in 1991 using monies from a $26.6 million land claim settlement with the governments of Alberta and Canada, it has achieved remarkable success. This success is evident in the wide arra y of business practice awards the group and its constituent companies have received, including Client of the Year (2008, Mikisew Group), Alberta Business Award of Distinction Eagle Feather finalist (2010, Mikisew Group), Alberta Apprenticeship and Industry Training Board Aboriginal Employer of the Year (2011, Mikis ew Fleet Man a gement), Pacrim Hospitality Company of the Year (2008, Super 8 Fort McMurray), Alberta Hotel and Lodging Association Housekeeping Award (2012, Super 8 Fort McMurray), and the Fort McMurray Tourism Ambassador of the Year (2009, Tim Gilles, general manager, Mikisew Sport Fishing).

But the Mikisew Group is not just a business. It is part of the MCFN’s overall strategy for increasing self-sufficiency and self-determination. Its success in these terms is evident in the substantial revenue it generates for MCFN, the jobs and careers it provides for the nation ’s citizens, and its ability to promote MCFN voice in decisions that affect the nation’s Aboriginal territory. This case study, part of a larger conversation about Aboriginal business achievement, explores the decisions and practices that have contributed to the Mikisew Group’s success.

Native Nations
Resource Type
Citation

Jorgensen, Miriam and Rachel Starks. Forwarding First Nation Goals Through Enterprise Ownership: The Mikisew Group Of Companies. Prepared for the Indigenous Leadership and Management Program, The Banff Centre. Native Nations Institute for Leadership, Management, and Policy. The University of Arizona. Tucson, Arizona. April 2014. Case Study. (http://nni.arizona.edu/application/files/2314/6179/0332/2014-4_mikisew_case_study.pdf, accessed April 17, 2014)

Indian Act Colonialism: A Century Of Dishonour, 1869-1969

Author
Producer
National Centre for First Nations Governance
Year

In 1867, with the passage of the British North America Act, Canadians began the process of nation building. Over the next few years, new provinces emerged--Manitoba, British Columbia, Prince Edward Island--and Canada became, by 1873, a nation from sea to sea. At the same time, by way of three legal instruments, the federal government was equipped to function as an imperial power. Section 91:24 of the B.N.A. Act assigned to it the responsibility for all "Indians and lands reserved for Indians" a responsibility that had been carried by the Imperial government for the previous century. The Rupert's Land Order in Council transferred the vast Hudson's Bay territories to Canada's exclusive jurisdiction. And finally, in the Indian Act of 1869, the government set out its own vision of future Canada-First Nations relations: an aggressive colonizing project of assimilation not only of First Nations in those territories but of all First Nations throughout the nation.

Native Nations
Resource Type
Topics
Citation

Milloy, John. "Indian Act Colonialism: A Century Of Dishonour, 1869-1969". Research Paper for the National Centre for First Nations Governance. The National Centre for First Nations Governance. Canada. May 2008. Paper.