effective governance

Maintaining accountability between levels of governance in Indigenous economic development: Examples from British Columbia, Canada

Year

Many Indigenous communities in Canada have established economic development corporations (EDCs) to support economic development that meets community goals. Indigenous EDCs, like social enterprises, typically prioritize multiple socio-economic goals and may be used to limit political influence on business operations; however, complete separation can be detrimental to success. This article explores formal mechanisms used by Indigenous EDCs to maintain accountability between levels of governance and ensure Indigenous community- owned businesses remain focused on community objectives. A literature review, interviews and document analysis were used to identify formal mechanisms to maintain accountability in the context of Indigenous community-owned forestry businesses in British Columbia, Canada.

Resource Type
Citation

Hotte, N., Nelson, H., Hawkins, T., Wyatt, S., & Kozak, R. (2018). Maintaining accountability between levels of governance in Indigenous economic development: Examples from British Columbia, Canada. Canadian Public Administration,61(4), 523-549.https://doi.org/10.1111/capa.12287

On the Front Lines: Tribal Nations Take on COVID-19

Year

Like governments around the world, America’s 574 federally recognized tribal nations are racing to protect their citizens from the coronavirus. Impacting tribes at a rate four times higher than for the US population, the pandemic is testing the limits of tribal public health infrastructures. Simultaneously, shuttered casinos and other business enterprises are crippling tribal economies. Coupled with an inefficient federal response, resources to provide critical governmental services are being rapidly depleted, intensifying the crisis. This conversation, facilitated on May 26th, 2020 by Harvard Kennedy School’s Ash Center, features the following leaders:

  • Dr. Laura Hammitt, Director of Infectious Disease Programs, Johns Hopkins University Center for American Indian Health
  • Prof. Joe Kalt, Ford Foundation Professor (Emeritus) of International Political Economy & Co-Director, Harvard Project on American Indian Economic Development
  • Mr. Del Laverdure, Attorney. Former Acting Assistant Secretary, Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary & Deputy Assistant Secretary for Indian Affairs, US Dept. of the Interior
  • Hon. Stephen Roe Lewis, Governor, Gila River Indian Community, HKS MPA 2006 
  • Megan Minoka Hill, Moderator, Program Director, Harvard Project on American Indian Economic Development & Director, Honoring Nations

Governor Stephen Roe Lewis Distinguished Tribal Leader Lecture

Producer
Native Nations Institute
Year

Governor Stephen Roe Lewis of the Gila River Indian Community visited the University of Arizona to speak at January in Tucson: Distinguished Tribal Leader Lecture sponsored by the Native Nations Institute and held at the Indigenous Peoples Law & Policy program at James E. Rogers College of Law. In the tradition of his family legacy of leadership for the Akimel O’otham and Pee-Posh people of this desert riparian region of Arizona, Governor Lewis has been a steady leader in the Tribal Government of the Gila River Indian Community through several successful initiatives centered around revitalization of the Gila River and new Gila River Indian Community schools. His approach to Native Nation Building is exemplified in these examples as he shows careful planning and consideration to creating innovative ideas, strong capable institutional support, and centering cultural match to the outcomes. This dedication to a vision of self-determination by leadership in the Gila River Indian Community as shown by Governor Lewis presents an example to the potential of Native Nation Building.

Transcript available upon request. Please email: nni@email.arizona.edu

Herminia Frias: Working Toward Effective Native Leadership

Producer
Native Nations Institute
Year

For years at Pascua Yaqui Tribe, Herminia Frias has remained a consistent leader in tribal government. She became the first woman elected Chairwoman and youngest to serve the position. After a contentious term with the tribal council, she was removed from office but then immediately returned to tribal council by being successfully elected to tribal council where she continues to serve. Councilwoman Frias spoke at the Native Women in Governance speaker series from Native Nations Institute and the Indigenous Peoples Law and Policy Program where she detailed the challenges she faced and her determination to not quit on being a Native leader. After that speech, Herminia Frias spoke to NNI in an interview that offered her reflections and perspectives on what it means to be a Native Nation building leader. She outlines the finer points of making indigenous governance work for the Pascua Yaqui Tribe that involves working with diverse views and approaches toward governance. Her experiences mark an invaluable perspective about Native leadership that touches on unique challenges and successes toward building more self-determination for her Native Nation.

Native Nations
Resource Type
Citation

Native Nations Institute. "Herminia Frias: Working Toward Native Leadership.” Leading Native Nations, Native Nations Institute, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, February, 2019

Transcript available upon request. Please email: nni@email.arizona.edu

Navajo Nation President Jonathan Nez: Native Nation Building for the Navajo Nation

Producer
Native Nations Institute
Year

Navajo Nation President Jonathan Nez visited the University of Arizona and gave his views on making governance work for people in he Navajo Nation.  In this brief interview with NNI the President offered his thoughts on Native Nation Building and the way it is utilized for the Navajo nation as well as his insight on making governance happen without a written constitution.

Native Nations
Resource Type
Citation

Native Nations Institute. "Navajo Nation President Jonathan Nez: Native Nation Building for the Navajo Nation.” Leading Native Nations, Native Nations Institute, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, December 3, 2019

Transcript available upon request. Please email: nni@email.arizona.edu

Navajo Nation President Jonathan Nez Distinguished Tribal Leaders Lecture

Producer
Native Nations Institute
Year

The Indigenous Peoples Law and Policy Program hosted the Distinguished Tribal Leaders Lecture at the University of Arizona James E Rogers College of Law featuring the recently elected Navajo Nation President Jonathan Nez. The president gave his views on working for a Native Nation and making governance work for people in he Navajo Nation. He was joined by Miss Navajo Nation 2019 Shaandiin Parrish and Deputy Chief of Staff Milton Bluehouse Jr. who also gave their thoughts about serving their Native Nation.

Native Nations
Resource Type
Citation

Native Nations Institute. "Navajo Nation President Jonathan Nez Distinguished Tribal Leaders Lecture," Indigenous Peoples Law and Policy Program, University of Arizona. Tucson, Arizona. December 3, 2019

Transcript available upon request. Please email: nni@email.arizona.edu

Navigating the Structures of Native Nations

Producer
Native Nations Institute
Year

Native Nations Institute presented a panel at TENWEST 2019 in Tucson called “Navigating the Structures of Native Nations.” Arizona is home to 22 Native nations, many whom are major economic drivers. Panelists presented an overview of Native nations including their socio-economic challenges, governmental form, authorities, laws, and economic environments. Representatives from two of Tucson’s Indigenous communities, the Tohono O’odham Nation and the Pascua Yaqui Tribe, shared suggestions for building effective inter-governmental relationships. Panelists included are:

Joan Timeche, Executive Director, Native Nations Institute

Austin Nunez, Chairman, San Xavier District Tohono O’odham Nation

Herminia Frias, Councilwoman, Pascua Yaqui Tribal Council

Resource Type
Citation

Native Nations Institute. "Navigating the Structures of Native Nations" TENWEST 2019. Tucson, Arizona. October 14, 2019

Transcript available upon request. Please email: nni@email.arizona.edu

Meeting the Need for Higher Education and Professional Development

Producer
Native Nations Institute
Year

Native Nations Institute and the Indigenous Governance Program presented a panel at TENWEST 2019 in Tucson called “Meeting the Need for Higher Education & Professional Development.” The panelists presented a case study on how the Indigenous Governance Program (and a proposed School of Indigenous Governance and Development that is still in the planning phase) at the University of Arizona was created to address a growing need for education related to Indigenous governance best practices among tribal nations in the U.S. and Indigenous communities around the world. To date, the program has reached over 350 participants from over 30 Native nations on 6 continents.

Included in the presentation are stories about how these programs have helped tribes to strengthen their governance, rebuild their nations, and demonstrate sovereignty in action. Panelists included are: 

Joan Timeche, Executive Director, Native Nations Institute

Tory Fodder, Indigenous Governance Program Manager

Robert Williams, Jr., JD, Professor, Regent’s Professor, Indigenous Peoples Law and Policy Program, University of Arizona

Transcript available upon request. Please email: nni@email.arizona.edu

Issues in Open Data: Indigenous Data Sovereignty

Year

Open data in the context of Indigenous peoples is a double-edged sword. Open data is a site of tension for Indigenous peoples. Open data provides opportunities for sustainable development according to Indigenous aspirations, yet also sits at the nexus of current and historic data challenges as a result of colonisation, bias, and a lack of knowledge of Indigenous rights. Indigenous data sovereignty (IDS) provides a framework for maximising the benefit of open data for Indigenous peoples and other users of Indigenous data and for affecting the stewardship of all data. Open data communities often assume many binaries, including a single government actor (nation-states), that data is open or not, and that open data is useful data (devoid of biases and relevance issues). In the context of Indigenous peoples, there are clear challenges for the mainstream open data movement around these binaries, as well as paths forward to assure the protection of Indigenous rights and data for development.

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Resource Type
Citation

Rainie, S., Kukutai, T., Walter, M., Figueroa-Rodriguez, O., Walker, J., & Axelsson, P. (2019) Issues in Open Data - Indigenous Data Sovereignty. In T. Davies, S. Walker, M. Rubinstein, & F. Perini (Eds.), The State of Open Data: Histories and Horizons. Cape Town and Ottawa: African Minds and International Development Research Centre.

Print version DOI: 10.5281/zenodo.2677801

Diane Enos: Endurance through Native Leadership

Producer
Native Nations Institute
Year

Diane Enos is an Attorney, Councilwoman & Former President of Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community. She has also served as Vice President of the Inter-Tribal Council of Arizona, Chairwoman of the Arizona Indian Gaming Association, and as a Western Area Delegate to the Tribal Justice Advisory Group, U.S. Department of Justice.

Diane draws from decades of service in tribal government, sharing key insights related to the challenges that Native peoples face in developing effective partnerships with local governments. She also discusses her path toward leading her Nation as a Native two-spirit woman.

In this interview, Diane offers her years of perspective an experience on what it means to engage and govern through Native leadership. Especially in the environment of her tribe that is constantly navigating their indigenous governance within areas of non-Native institutions and residencies.

People
Resource Type
Citation

Native Nations Institute. "Diane Enos: Endurance through Native Leadership.” Leading Native Nations, Native Nations Institute, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, January 15, 2019

Transcript available upon request. Please email: nni@email.arizona.edu