reconciliation

The 2013 Narrm Oration: Taiaiake Alfred

Producer
The University of Melbourne
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The 2013 Narrm Oration, "Being and becoming Indigenous: Resurgence against contemporary colonialism", was delivered by Professor Taiaiake Alfred on 28 November.

Professor Alfred is the founding Director of the Indigenous Governance Program at the University of Victoria in British Columbia, Canada. He specializes in traditions of governance, decolonization strategies, and land based cultural restoration.

The Narrm Oration has been hosted annually by Murrup Barak, Melbourne Institute for Indigenous Development at The University of Melbourne with the support of Rio Tinto Australia since 2009.

Native Nations
Resource Type
Citation

"The 2013 Narrm Oration: Taiaiake Alfred." Murrup Barak, Melbourne Institute for Indigenous Development at The University of Melbourne. The University of Melbourne. Parkville, Victoria. November 28, 2013. Video. (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VwJNy-B3lPA, accessed January 6, 2014)

The situation of indigenous peoples in the United States of America

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Year

In this report, the United Nations Special Rapporteur on the rights of indigenous peoples examines the human rights situation of indigenous peoples in the United States, on the basis of research and information gathered, including during a visit to the country from 23 April to 4 May 2012. During his mission, the Special Rapporteur held consultations with United States officials as well as with indigenous peoples, tribes, and nations in Washington, D.C., Arizona, Alaska, Oregon, Washington state; South Dakota and Oklahoma, both in Indian country and in urban areas. Appendices I and II to this report include, respectively, summaries of information provided by the Government and of information submitted by indigenous peoples, organizations and individuals in connection with the mission...

Resource Type
Citation

Anaya, James. "The situation of indigenous peoples in the United States of America." Report of the Special Rapporteur on the rights of indigenous peoples. Human Rights Council. General Assembly. United Nations. Geneva, Switzerland. August 30, 2012. Paper. (http://unsr.jamesanaya.org/docs/countries/2012-report-usa-a-hrc-21-47-add1_en.pdf, accessed February 13, 2024)

Indigenous Governance: Questioning the Status and the Possibilities for Reconciliation with Canada's Commitment to Aboriginal and Treaty Rights

Producer
Centre for First Nations Governance
Year

Indigenous peoples have always had governance. This fact has been a matter of great debate among Canadian politicians and scholars for many years, but there is little doubt that Indigenous Nations had developed for themselves complex systems of government prior to colonization. The important questions that need to be asked today do not concern the pre-existence of Indigenous government but instead raise questions of the existence of Indigenous government today. Are Indian Act band councils governments? What about "traditional" governments? What about self-government? This paper responds to such questions concerning the status of Indigenous governments as governments and considers their place in the federal and constitutional order of Canada.  

Native Nations
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Ladner, Kiera L. "Indigenous Governance: Questioning the Status and the Possibilities for Reconciliation with Canada's Commitment to Aboriginal and Treaty Rights". Research Paper for the National Centre for First Nations Governance. The National Centre for First Nations Governance. Canada. September 15, 2006. Paper. (https://fngovernance.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/09/kiera_ladner.pdf, accessed July 25, 2023)

The Crown's Constitutional Duty to Consult and Accomodate Aboriginal and Treaty Rights

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The Crown’s duty to consult and accommodate Aboriginal and treaty rights is a fundamental matter of social justice that invokes very solemn legal obligations. Reconciliation and win-win situations can be achieved with good faith negotiations if the federal and provincial Crown immediately endorses and commits to a significant change in their current consultation and accommodation policies and practices. Basic tenets relating to the respect, recognition and reconciliation of Aboriginal and treaty rights must be coupled with joint decision-making and dispute resolution processes. Our courts have established and developed legal principles concerning enforceable Crown obligations that provide shape and substance to the consultation and accommodation process. The courts have also underscored the need for reconciliation and negotiated solutions to outstanding aboriginal title and treaty rights disputes. Aboriginal peoples are entitled at law to have a clear and decisive voice in Crown decisions that may impact, not only the use and disposition of their traditional lands and resources, but also their social and cultural well-being. Unilateral decision-making by the Crown is no longer legal in this context. At the heart of the Crown’s legal responsibility to consult and accommodate aboriginal and treaty rights are choices made every day by Crown leaders and officials which very seriously impact, not only fundamental constitutional rights, but the very health and well being of hundreds of thousands of women, men and children living in Canada.

Native Nations
Resource Type
Citation

Morellato, Maria. "The Crown's Constitutional Duty to Consult and Accomodate Aboriginal and Treaty Rights". Research Paper for the National Centre for First Nations Governance. National Centre for First Nations Governance. Canada. February 2008. Paper.