off-reservation members

Residence, Community Engagement, and Citizenship: How do non-resident tribal citizens connect with Native nations?

Year

The research draws from an online survey targeted primarily at younger tribal citizens living away from tribal lands; this project provides preliminary insight into 1) non-resident citizens' engagement with their tribes, and 2) the ways tribes might connect more effectively with non-resident citizens, should they choose to do so.

Native Nations
Resource Type
Citation

Schultz, Jennifer Lee, Stephanie Carroll Rainie, and Rachel Rose Starks. Residence, Community Engagement, and Citizenship: How do non-resident tribal citizens connect with Native nations? Connecting Across Distance & Difference: Tribal Citizenship in a New Era. The NCAI Policy Research Center Tribal Leader/Scholar Forum. National Congress of American Indians Mid Year Conference. St. Paul, Minnesota. June 30, 2015. Paper.

How Can Tribes Relate to Off-Reservation Citizens Better? Study Aims to Help

Author
Producer
Indian Country Today
Year

How do you define “home?”

“Home is where one starts from” is one explanation, while another states, “Our feet may leave home, but not our hearts.”

Where you call home is especially important to Native Americans who have left the familiarity of where they grew up among fellow tribal members and moved to urban areas. How they stay connected with their past and what efforts their tribes make to stay in touch is the genesis of a recent pilot study on young adult tribal citizens living off the reservation...

Native Nations
Resource Type
Citation

Allen, Lee. "How Can Tribes Relate to Off-Reservation Citizens Better? Study Aims to Help." Indian Country Today. July 28, 2015. Article. (https://ictnews.org/archive/how-can-tribes-relate-to-off-reservation-citizens-better-study-aims-to-help, accessed July 18, 2023)

Oglala Sioux Tribe to issue IDs at tournament

Year

For the first time in its history the Oglala Sioux Tribe will bring its enrollment office to the public.

During this year’s Lakota Nation Invitational in Rapid City the tribe will have a booth set up to issue tribal IDs to enrolled members who may not have the opportunity to travel to Pine Ridge to get them...

Native Nations
Resource Type
Citation

Ecoffey, Brandon. "Oglala Sioux Tribe to issue IDs at tournament." Native Sun News. November 25, 2014. Article. (http://indianz.com/News/2014/015762.asp, accessed November 25, 2014)

Metro Week: Native American Youth Desire Ties to Homeland

Producer
Arizona Public Media
Year

Arizona has 21 American Indian tribes, and 5.3 percent of the state population reports tribal membership to the U.S. Census Bureau. Metro Week explores Native American culture and education.

On the program:

  • The Native Nations Institute, a research unit at the University of Arizona, surveyed young Native Americans to find out how connected they want to be to their tribes. The short answer: they desire a affiliation with their heritage when they do not live on a reservation.
  • Andrew Martinez is a UA student and member of two tribes. He says it is his responsibility to be in touch with his tribes, and wants to work in tribal government after he graduates.
  • Some charter schools on reservations, or that feature American Indian culture, have come under academic scrutiny. AZPM reporter Mariana Dale explains.
  • The UA American Indian Studies Department is the first in the state to offer a bachelor's, master's and doctoral degree. We find out about the demand for the new bachelor's degree with professor Franci Washburn, who helped create the program.
Citation

"Metro Week: Native American Youth Desire Ties to Homeland" (Producer: Andrea Kelly). Arizona Public Media. August 8, 2015. Video. (https://news.azpm.org/p/news-articles/2015/8/7/69721-metro-week-stu..., accessed August 11, 2015)