traditional foods

Hopi Farm Talk Podcast: Indigenous Foods Knowledges Network Gathering with Mary Beth Jäger

Producer
Hopi Farm Talk Podcast
Year

On September 12-16, 2022, the Natwani Coalition & Hopi Foundation hosted the Indigenous Foods Knowledges Network (IFKN) on Hopi Territory. This historic gathering connected Indigenous communities from Alaska and the Southwest in spaces provided for a sharing of knowledge. Tribal food and data sovereignty were areas of focus as the growing conversation over the unique responses to rapid environmental changes that bond geographically distant Indigenous communities. IFKN's Mary Beth Jäger, Citizen Band Potawatomi, sits down with the Natwani Coalition to reflect on time spend in Hopi and Tewa communities.

Native Nations
Resource Type
Citation

Hopi Farm Talk. "Indigenous Foods Knowledges Network Gathering: Mary Beth Jäger". October 2022. Spotify. Podcast. https://open.spotify.com/episode/...

Transcripts for all videos are available by request. Please email us: nni@arizona.edu.

Food Sovereignty: How Osage People Will Grow Fresh Foods Locally

Year

Growing fresh and local foods for Osage people is now a revived approach to food sovereignty for the Osage Nation so efforts to find the most successful methods are being looked into by leadership and community members. On Feb. 7, the Oklahoma Department of Agriculture along with the Oklahoma State University Institute of Technology Okmulgee hosted the eighth annual workshop for ‘plasticulture’ farming workshops...

Native Nations
Resource Type
Citation

HorseChief-Hamilton, Geneva. "Food Sovereignty: How Osage People Will Grow Fresh Foods Locally." Indian Country Today. February 12, 2015. Article. (https://ictnews.org/archive/food-sovereignty-how-osage-people-will-grow-fresh-foods-locally, accessed May 5, 2023)

Revitalizing a Traditional Seed to Revitalize Osage Culture

Producer
Indian Country Today
Year

Vann Bighorse, director of the Wah-Zha-Zhi Cultural Center in Pawhuska, Oklahoma, is keenly aware that Osage traditions are getting closer to slipping away–permanently.

A current project to preserve Osage culture and revive a millennia old tradition is now three years in the making. The Cultural Center has been building a collection of heirloom seeds and recently started growing traditional foods for traditional purposes. The Cultural Center currently has a small garden located at the facility. It is a small garden with huge potential, and Bighorse knows this project has to happen now...

Native Nations
Resource Type
Citation

Jefferson, Anna. "Revitalizing a Traditional Seed to Revitalize Osage Culture." Indian Country Today Media Network. February 12, 2015. Article. (https://ictnews.org/archive/revitalizing-a-traditional-seed-to-revitalize-osage-culture, accessed October 18, 2023)

Cherokee seed project sows respect for the past, hope for the future

Author
Year

The Cherokee Indians are preserving the roots of their heritage with a program that allows officially recognized members of the tribe to access seeds that are unique to the Cherokee Nation.

Principal Chief of the Cherokee Nation, Bill John Baker explained the seeds' lineage to CNN. "This strain of seeds came with us on the Trail of Tears," he said, referring to the forced migration of Cherokee nation from their land east of the Mississippi to an area that is now Oklahoma. The 15,000-person march took place in 1838 and 1839 under Andrew Jackson's Indian removal policy, and resulted in the deaths of an estimated 4000 Cherokees, due to starvation and sickness...

Native Nations
Resource Type
Citation

Keesee, Kellie. "Cherokee seed project sows respect for the past, hope for the future." CNN. January 16, 2014. Article. (https://eatocracy.blogs.cnn.com/2014/01/16/cherokee-seed-project/, accessed March 22, 2023)

Winona LaDuke: Keep USDA Out of Our Kitchens

Author
Year

Native American author, educator, activist, mother and grandmother Winona LaDuke, Anishinaabekwe, is calling on tribes to relocalize food and energy production as a means of both reducing CO2 emissions and of asserting tribes' inherent right to live in accordance with their own precepts of the sacredness of Mother Earth and responsibility to future generations.

She said during a recent presentation on climate change at Harvard University, "We essentially need tribal food and energy policies that reflect sustainability. Tribes [as sovereign nations] have jurisdiction over food from seed to table and we need to take it or else USDA will take it…The last thing you want is USDA telling you how to cook your hominy, that you can't use ashes in it…I am the world-renowned, or reservation-wide renowned, beaver tamale queen. So who's going to come to my house and [inspect the beaver]? I don't want USDA in my food. I want us to exercise control over our food and not have them saying we can't eat what we traditionally eat."

LaDuke was talking about tribal food sovereignty... 

Resource Type
Citation

Lee, Tanya H. "Winona LaDuke: Keep USDA Out of Our Kitchens." Indian Country Today Media Network. December 2, 2013. Article. (https://ictnews.org/archive/winona-laduke-keep-usda-out-of-our-kitchens, accessed February 23, 2023)

A Solution: Sowing the future for tribal youth

Author
Year

For aspiring farmer, Vernal Sam, 24, the physical labor came easily. Like many Tohono O'odham, he'd helped out on his uncle's cattle ranch as a kid, bringing in cash when his family needed it, and he'd helped his grandfather bury traditional tepary beans and squash seeds in the brown clay soil. What felt different about his new farm apprentice job was the sense of possibility within the bounds of the reservation...

Native Nations
Resource Type
Citation

Bregel,Emily. "A Solution: Sowing the future for tribal youth." Arizona Daily Star. August 08, 2013. Article. (http://tucson.com/news/local/sowing-the-future-for-tribal-youth/article..., accessed February 24, 2023)

Muckleshoot Food Sovereignty Project

Producer
Northwest Indian College
Year

The Muckleshoot Food Sovereignty Project is helping to increase understanding of Native foods and build community food security by exploring the Muckleshoot Tribe's food assets and access to local, healthy and traditional foods.

Native Nations
Citation

Northwest Indian College. "Muckleshoot Food Sovereignty Project." Northwest Indian College. Grant from First Nations Development Institute (FNDI). Bellingham, Washington. 2013. Video. (https://vimeo.com/88034342, accessed March 24, 2014)

The Ways: Lake Superior Whitefish: Carrying on a Family Tradition

Producer
Finn Ryan
Year

The Petersons are part of a long tradition of commercial fishing among Lake Superior tribes. Avid fishermen for subsistence prior to European settlement, the Lake Superior Chippewa quickly found Gichigami’s (Ojibwe word for Lake Superior) fish to be a valued trade item once explorers penetrated to this inland sea. Tribal fishermen traded fish harvested from birch bark canoes, using gill nets made from twisted and knotted strips of willow bark...

Citation

Ryan, Finn. "Lake Superior Whitefish: Carry on a Family Tradition." The Ways: Great Lakes Native Culture & Language. Wisconsin Media Lab. Madison, Wisconsin. 2013. (http://theways.org/story/lake-superior-whitefish, accessed March 1, 2013)

Food Sovereignty Assessment Tool

Year

There are many assets related to Native food systems. Increased consumption of healthy and traditional foods may lead to better health among community members, preserving one of the most important assets in any community, its people. Of course, healthy, productive people are a cornerstone of any healthy community, but the last 200 years of federal policy toward Native Americans has reduced their control of land, disrupted traditional agricultural practices, and dramatically changed diets. Despite challenges created by historical practices and current environments in Native communities, there are many examples of successful projects whereby people are reclaiming local food systems, educating community members about diet-related diseases, revitalizing traditions associated with agriculture, and developing new food and agricultural enterprises. Food sovereignty assessments are one strategy that can be used to help reach these goals, and to revitalize Native agriculture and food systems. Implementing these tools will assist in identifying barriers and opportunities in the areas of health, economic development, and cultural revitalization as they relate to food and agriculture.

Native Nations
Resource Type
Citation

Bell-Sheeter, Alicia. Food Sovereignty Assessment Tool. Native Agriculture and Food Systems Initiative. First Nations Development Institute. Fredericksburg, Virginia. 2004. Tool. (http://www.indigenousfoodsystems.org/sites/default/files/tools/FNDIFSATF..., accessed May 5, 2023)

Good Food is Power: A collection of traditional foods stories from the Ramah Navajo Community, Standing Rock Sioux Tribe and Tohono O'odham Nation

Year

This report explores the traditional foods movement through the lenses of three traditional foods programs: the Ramah Navajo Community, Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, and Tohono O’odham Nation. These stories were originally gathered by the University of Oklahoma’s American Indian Institute (Wesner, 2012), to be featured on the organization’s Wellness in Native America blog. The programs in this report were interviewed along with three other tribally-supported traditional foods programs from the Aleutian Pribilof Islands Association, Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma, and the Southeast Alaska Regional Health Consortium. While each of these programs is unique and diverse, they share in common the Traditional Foods Program, an initiative supported by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) Native Diabetes Wellness Program (NDWP). Although the author is currently working with the NDWP on a compendium of traditional foods stories, the stories in this report were compiled prior to this partnership.

Resource Type
Citation

Native Diabetes Wellness Program. (2014). Good Food is Power: A collection of traditional foods stories from the Ramah Navajo Community, Standing Rock Sioux Tribe and Tohono O’odham Nation. Native Diabetes Wellness Program. Native Diabetes Wellness Program, Centers for Disease Control & Prevention. Atlanta, Georgia. Paper. (https://www.cdc.gov/diabetes/projects/ndwp/pdf/part_ii_good_food_is_power-508.pdf, accessed May 16, 2023)