Indian Country Today

Tribal workforce development: Success starts with governance

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A movement is sweeping across Indian Country. Over the past several decades, a growing number of tribal nations have reclaimed their right to govern their own affairs, and are slowly but surely charting brighter futures of their own making. Wrestling primary-decision making authority away from the federal government, they are “addressing severe social problems, building sustainable economies, and reinvigorating their cultures, languages, and ways of life.” In the process, they are affirming what Native peoples have always known – that tribal self-determination and self-governance is the only policy capable of improving their lives and the quality of life in their communities.

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Indian Country Today. 2018. "Tribal workforce development: Success starts with governance." July 30, 2018. https://newsmaven.io/indiancountrytoday/opinion/tribal-workforce-develo… 

Cheyenne River Youth Project's Garden Evolving Into Micro Farm

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When the Cheyenne River Youth Project started its organic garden in 1999, staff at the 26-year-old nonprofit would never have guessed where the little garden would take them.

The two-acre Winyan Toka Win–or “Leading Lady”–garden is the heart of the youth project, and is becoming a micro farm. Sustainable agriculture at the youth project in Eagle Butte, South Dakota supports nutritious meals and snacks at the main youth center for 4 to 12 year olds and at the Cokata Wiconi Teen Center. The garden also provides fresh ingredients for the farm-to-table Keya Café, merchandise for the Keya Gift Shop, and seasonal Leading Lady Farmers Market. To continue with the garden’s success, CRYP has invested in a new irrigation system, a garden redesign, and a composting system...

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ICT Staff. "Cheyenne River Youth Project’s Garden Evolving Into Micro Farm." Indian Country Today. July 6, 2015. Article. (https://ictnews.org/archive/cheyenne-river-youth-projects-garden-evolving-into-micro-farm, accessed March 22, 2023)

Catalyx and Ramona Tribe Start Work on 100% Off-Grid Renewable Energy Eco Tourism Resort

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Catalyx, Inc. has been contracted to be the technology provider and will team with the Ramona Band of the Cahuilla Indian Tribe to develop the Tribe's Eco-Tourism resort near Anza, Calif. The first of its kind, the Ramona Band of Cahuilla Mission Native Americans' resort is designed as a 100% off-grid renewable energy project that will employ multiple alternative energy technologies to meet 100% of its energy needs and recycle much of its own waste byproducts, such as sewage, biogas, and restaurant food waste...

Native Nations
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Indian Country Today. "Catalyx and Ramona Tribe Start Work on 100% Off-Grid Renewable Energy Eco Tourism Resort." June 17, 2009. Article. (https://ictnews.org/archive/catalyx-inc-and-ramona-tribe-start-work-on-100-percent-renewable-energy-ecotourism-resort, accessed March 22, 2023)

Eastern Band of Cherokee Replenishes Iconic White-Tailed Deer on Its Lands

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The Eastern Band of Cherokee, deprived for centuries of the white-tailed deer that symbolizes their culture, are in the process of getting their icon back.

Though deer are considered almost a pest in many parts, devouring gardens and proliferating, the Cherokee themselves, who have cherished the animal for 10,000 years or more, do not have them on their own lands in what is today western North Carolina. 

A new program is taking deer from Morrow Mountain State Park in the Uwharrie Mountains in North Carolina, where their eating habits and numbers threaten plant species, and transplanting them into the Eastern Band’s 5,130-acre natural preserve on Cherokee tribal lands...

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ICT Staff. "Eastern Band of Cherokee Replenishes Iconic White-Tailed Deer on Its Lands." Indian Country Today. May 1, 2014. Article. (https://ictnews.org/archive/eastern-band-of-cherokee-replenishes-iconic-white-tailed-deer-on-its-lands, accessed April 11, 2023)

Cheyenne River Youth Project Turns 25, Launches Endowment and Keya Cafe Featuring Homegrown Food

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Twenty-five years ago, Julie Garreau (Cheyenne River Lakota) developed the Cheyenne River Youth Project (CRYP) from a converted bar on Main Street in the tribe's capital Eagle Butte, South Dakota. For 12 years she volunteered her time to get an after-school program off the ground...

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ICT Staff. "Cheyenne River Youth Project Turns 25, Launches Endowment and Keya Cafe Featuring Homegrown Food." Indian Country Today. January 28, 2014. Article. (https://ictnews.org/archive/cheyenne-river-youth-project-turns-25-launches-endowment-and-keya-cafe-featuring-homegrown-food, accessed March 22, 2023)

Citizen Stewards: Chickasaw Nation Technicians Monitor Water Quality

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Regulations and laws about environmental quality abound, yet the Chickasaw Nation has little use for them.

Its citizens do not need legislation to inform them that they are stewards of the land. It is, of course, an immutable fact of existence. And Chickasaw Nation Environmental Services technician Brent Shields takes that charge very seriously, monitoring the health of rivers and streams that flow through his tribe’s territory and delivering the daily results to state and federal environmental agencies, the Chickasaw Nation said in a statement in December...

Native Nations
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ICT Staff. "Citizen Stewards: Chickasaw Nation Technicians Monitor Water Quality." Indian Country Today. January 6, 2014. Article. (https://ictnews.org/archive/citizen-stewards-chickasaw-nation-technicians-monitor-water-quality, accessed March 23, 2023)

DOJ Grants Muscogee Creek Nation $3.78 Million for Ex-Prisoner Reintegration Program

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The Muscogee Creek Nation has received $3.78 million from the U.S. Department of Justice for the tribe’s Reintegration Program (RIP), which assists tribal citizens who have served time in a correctional facility and are ready to be welcomed back into society.

The grant will go towards the construction and renovation of a regional, Henryetta, Oklahoma-based transitional living facility for these citizens, designed to help address public safety issues. It will also provide a positive and structured environment for clients to receive educational and vocational training by teaching valuable life and job skills and providing core classes...

Native Nations
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ICT Staff. "DOJ Grants Muscogee Creek Nation $3.78 Million for Ex-Prisoner Reintegration Program." Indian Country Today. November 8, 2013. Article. (https://ictnews.org/archive/doj-grants-muscogee-creek-nation-378-million-for-ex-prisoner-reintegration-program, accessed April 5, 2023)

CDFI Fund Awards Indian Land Capital Company its Third $750K Award

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For the third year in a row, Indian Land Capital Company (ILCC), an American Indian-owned and -managed Native Community Development Financial Institution (Native CDFI) and leader in the tribal land financing and acquisition movement, has received the highest tier financial award, $750,000, from the Treasury Department’s CDFI Fund...

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ICT Staff. "CDFI Fund Awards Indian Land Capital Company its Third $750K Award." Indian Country Today. October 8, 2013. Article. (https://ictnews.org/archive/cdfi-fund-awards-indian-land-capital-company-its-third-750k-award, accessed March 23, 2023)

Council of Energy Resource Tribes Enters $3 Billion Biofuels and Bioenergy Agreement

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The Council of Energy Resource Tribes (CERT), an Inter-Tribal organization comprised of 54 U.S. tribes and four First Nation Treaty Tribes of Canada, has entered into a long-term development agreement for up to $3 billion in biofuels and bioenergy projects, states a CERT press release...

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ICT Staff. "Council of Energy Resource Tribes Enters $3 Billion Biofuels and Bioenergy Agreement." Indian Country Today. September 25, 2012. Article. (https://ictnews.org/archive/council-of-energy-resource-tribes-enters-3-billion-biofuels-and-bioenergy-agreement, accessed March 29, 2023)

Immersion School is Saving a Native American Language

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The White Clay Immersion School on the Fort Belknap Indian Reservation in Harlem, Montana is trying to save the A’ani language. Thanks to the school’s efforts 26 students, a record for the school, are currently studying the Native American language...

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Indian Country Today Staff. "Immersion School is Saving a Native American Language." Indian Country Today, February 12, 2012. Article. (https://ictnews.org/archive/immersion-school-is-saving-a-native-american-language, accessed July 21, 2023)