Cultural Affairs

Sustaining Indigneous Culture: The Structure, Activities, and Needs of Tribal Archives, Libraries, and Museums

Year

Sovereignty, self-determination, and self-governance are primary goals of Indigenous nations worldwide and they take important steps toward those goals by renewing control over their stories, documents, and artifacts. 

To better support it, a core team of Native professionals formed the Association of Tribal, Archives, Libraries, and Museums (ATALM) in 2010. ATALM provides training, networking, and key information for the directors, managers, and staff of tribal cultural institutions (see www.atalm.org). In winter 2010-2011, with a grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Services, it also launched the first-ever comprehensive survey of tribal archives, libraries, and museums (TALMs), in an effort to document member organizations' institutional structure, outreach, and needs. 

This report summarizes findings from the survey. It is organized into 13 sections: sample description, management and operations, staff, training, finances, technology, digitization, programs and education, audience and visitation, conservation, archives, libraries, and museums.

Native Nations
Resource Type
Citation

Association of Tribal Archives, Libraries, and Museums, and Miriam Jorgensen. Sustaining Indigenous Culture: The Structure, Activities, and Needs of Tribal Archives, Libraries, and Museums. Association of Tribal Archives, Libraries, and Museums, 2012.
 

Wrapping Our Ways Around Them: Aboriginal Communities and the CFCSA Guidebook

Author
Year

This Guidebook is based on the belief that Aboriginal peoples need to know, and work with, the systems that impact children and families today such as the Child, Family and Community Service Act (CFCSA), Provincial Court (Child, Family and Community Service Act) Rules (Rules), Child, Family and Community Service Regulation (CFCSA Regulation), Ministry of Children and Family Development (MCFD) and delegated Aboriginal agencies.

Exercising exclusive jurisdiction over child welfare remains the goal for Aboriginal peoples: Restoring Aboriginal ways of doing things, especially in caring for children, is essential for the health and well-being of children and families. Successive generations of Aboriginal children continue to be taken into the child welfare system. Without intervention, experience has shown that the outcome for these children will be bleak and reverberate outward, influencing the future of entire families, communities and nations. This Guidebook suggests immediate steps that can be taken on the ground we are standing on–within the CFCSA and systems that impact Aboriginal children and families today–to improve outcomes for Aboriginal children while building toward a better future.

Resource Type
Citation

Walkem, Ardith. Wrapping Our Ways Around Them: Aboriginal Communities and the CFCSA Guidebook. ShchEma-mee.tkt Project. Nlaka’pamux Nation Tribal Council. British Columbia, Canada. 2015. Guide. (http://cwrp.ca/sites/default/files/publications/en/wowat_bc_cfcsa_1.pdf, accessed May 29, 2015)

Tribal Equity Toolkit: Sample Tribal Resolutions and Codes to Support Two Spirit & LGBT Justice in Indian Country

Year

This Toolkit has been developed to give tribal legislators a brief overview of legal and policy issues that impact the equal treatment of Two Spirit/ LGBT individuals. The Toolkit identifies areas in which existing laws discriminate against Two Spirit/ LGBT individuals, and offers sample resolution and code language for tribal lawmakers to consider adopting to maximize equality within their communities...

Citation

Native American Program of Legal Aid Services of Oregon, the Indigenous Ways of Knowing Program at Lewis & Clark Graduate School of Education and Counseling, the Western States Center, the Pride Foundation, and Basic Rights Oregon. "Tribal Equity Toolkit: Sample Tribal Resolutions and Codes to Support Two Spirit & LGBT Justice in Indian Country." Portland, Oregon. November 1, 2012. Paper. (https://graduate.lclark.edu/live/files/12737-tribal-equity-toolkit, accessed November 2, 2012)

AIS event: An Afternoon with Joanne Shenandoah and Doug George-Kanentiio

Producer
University of Arizona
Year

On April 12, 2021, the Department of American Indian Studies and Graduate Interdisciplinary Program presented "An Afternoon with Joanne Shenandoah & Doug George-Kanentiio."

Doug George-Kanentiio (Awkesasne Mohawk) is a Native author, intellectual and journalist. His presentation was on “Raised Fists - Indigenous, Latino, and Black Rights Movements.” Joanne Shenandoah (Oneida) is a GRAMMY and NAMMY award-winning performer. Her presentation was about “Lifegivers, Women's Rights Under Natural Law.”

Resource Type
Citation

The Department of American Indian Studies and Graduate Interdisciplinary Program. "An Afternoon with Joanne Shenandoah & Doug George-Kanentiio." University of Arizona. Tucson, Arizona. Wednesday, April 12, 2021 

Transcript available upon request. Please email: nni@email.arizona.edu

Stephen Roe Lewis: Effective Tribal Leadership for Change

Producer
Native Nations Institute
Year

Stephen Roe Lewis has been serving two terms as the Governor of the Gila River Indian Community. He follows a strong tradition and family legacy of leadership for the Akimel O’otham and Pee-Posh people in this desert riparian region of Arizona. Governor Lewis has worked on numerous political campaigns and organizing projects throughout Indian Country including Native voter organizing and Native voter protection in 2002 and selected as an Arizona delegate and Co-Chairing the Native American Caucus for the 2012 Democratic National Convention in Charlotte, North Carolina. As well as, serving on the Board of Directors for the Native American Rights Fund (NARF), the Executive Board for the National Indian Gaming Association (NIGA) and the Board of Trustees for the Heard Museum of Phoenix. Governor Lewis has wroked with his community to create solutions for resources and education in the Gila River Indian Community. The Management Aquifer Recharge site (MAR-5) project brings together the need for access to water while restoring the return of the Community's riparian area which is vital for farming and the return of wildlife to the Community, and developed a new eductaion reviatlze program to construct a Bureau of Indian Education replacement school and then lease that school back to the federal government. His longstanding work to create a strong Native Nation for the Gila River Inidan Community and making tribal eaderhsip work for change is told in this interview with Native Nations Institute. 

Resource Type
Citation

Native Nations Institute. "Stephen Roe Lewis: Effective Tribal Leadership for Change," Leading Native Nations, Native Nations Institute, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ. January 14, 2020

Transcript available upon request. Please email: nni@email.arizona.edu

Vernon Masayesva: Self-Governance and Protecting Water

Producer
Native Nations Institute
Year

Former Tribal Chairman of the Hopi Nation and Executive Director of Black Mesa Trust, Vernon Masayesva relays his thoughts about advocating for self-governance and protection of water rights for Indigenous people. His pursuits in holding accountability of mining in Hopi territory has made Vernon into a leading respected voice on maintaining the sovereignty of water for tribes and intervention toward both entities and pixies that threaten environmental harm on Native lands. Vernon describes his efforts through the creation of Black Mesa Trust and their activities while continuing to be active in keeping the Hopi Nation focused on self-governance that matches the sacred values toward natural resources.

Native Nations
Resource Type
Citation

Native Nations Institute. "Vernon Masayesva: Self-Governance and Protecting Water." University of Arizona Water Ethics Symposium, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, October 20, 2018

Transcript available upon request. Please email: nni@email.arizona.edu

Daryle Rigney: Asserting Cultural Match and Native Nation Building in Australia

Producer
Native Nations Institute
Year

Daryle Rigney brings his expertise and first-hand experiences as a citizen of Ngarrindjeri Nation in South Australian to share his thoughts about Native Nation Building for the Ngarrindjeri Nation. He is a Professor of Indigenous Strategy and Engagement at College of Humanities Arts and Sciences at Flinders University, Board member in the Australia Indigenous Governance Institute, and member of the Indigenous Advisory Council for the Native Nations Institute. Daryle has spent better part of the last two decades supporting and directly working in efforts to bring the Ngarrindjeri community into a Regional Authority that governs using Native Nation building principles. In this interview Daryle explains the ways that Ngarrindjeri negotiated their self-governance with South Australia and implemented there own governing process that aligns with Ngarrindjeri cultural practices. Daryle has also been at the forefront to understanding the challenges and work behind protecting aboriginal cultural heritage and property through his involvement in protection of Ngarrindjeri people, traditions, burial sites, and ancestral materials.

People
Native Nations
Resource Type
Citation

Native Nations Institute. "Daryle Rigney: Asserting Cultural Match and Native Nation Building in Australia.” Leading Native Nations, Native Nations Institute, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, January 11, 2019

Transcript available upon request. Please email: nni@email.arizona.edu

Karen Diver: Native leadership and Indigenous governance

Producer
Native Nations Institute
Year

Karen Diver is a former Chairwoman of the Fond du Lac Band of Lake Superior Chippewa and former Vice President of the Minnesota Chippewa tribe, while also served as an adviser to President Obama as his Special Assistant for Native American affairs. Her incredible career as  renowned Native leader for her tribe, in her community in the surrounding Minnesota area, and advocate for indigenous communities at the highest level of Federal government has offered her a truly unique perspective on what is required for strong indigenous governance. Karen’s strength as a Native leader led her to her recent position at the College of St. Scholastica Faculty Fellow for Inclusive Excellence where she brings her intimate knowledge on Native inclusivity to a broad community of high education. In this interview with Native Nations Institute, Karen Diver relays the many facets of putting leadership into action and making change for tribes at any level of indigenous governance.

People
Resource Type
Citation

Native Nations Institute. "Karen Diver: Native leadership and indigenous governance.” Leading Native Nations, Native Nations Institute, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, January 29, 2019

For a complete transcript, please email us: nni@email.arizona.edu

Native Nations and U.S. Borders: Challenges to Indigenous Culture, Citizenship, and Security

Year

A comprehensive review of Native nations along or near the U.S. borders with Mexico, Canada, and Russia response to border-related challenges to citizenship, crossing rights and border security, culture, the environment and natural resources, and public health and safety. This book seeks to inform discussions of border policy at all levels of government—tribal, local, state, and federal—and is intended to be a resource to Indigenous leaders; federal, state, and municipal policy-makers and authorities; researchers; and nongovernmental work involving border regions.

This is the downloadable PDF. Purchase the book on the NNI Shop.

Resource Type
Citation

Starks, Rachel Rose, Jen McCormack, and Stephen Cornell. Native Nations and the U.S. Borders: Challenges to Indigenous Culture, Citizenship, and Security. Udall Center Publications, The University of Arizona. Tucson, AZ. 2011. Book.

Mike Williams: Alaska Native governance and a healthy culture

Year

Mike Williams is a well known indigenous leaders from being a Chairman and Vice-Chair of the Alaska Inter-Tribal Council as well as Chief of the Yupiit Nation.  Mike offers his impressions about a variety of topics related indigenous governance including leadership, traditional governance, education, sovereignty, and culture.

People
Native Nations
Resource Type
Citation

Native Nations Institute. "Mike Williams: Alaska Native governance and a healthy culture."  Leading Native Nations, Native Nations Institute, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, November 15, 2016

For a complete transcript, please email us: nni@email.arizona.edu