indigenous leadership

Robert Joseph: History of Maori Governance and Self-Determination

Producer
Native Nations Institute
Year

In this interview, Māori barrister and Senior Lecturer at The University of Waikato Te Whare Wānanga o Waikato, Dr. Robert A. Joseph offers his expert analysis of governance and law through the historical perspective of Māori self-governance. Dr. Joseph gives a summary of the complexities of colonization over Māori lands under New Zealand governments and in particular a thorough examination of the Treaty of Waitangi that lays the foundations for the governance relationships of the Māori people with New Zealand governmental relations and society. Included with his historical accounts are the ways that law and jurisdiction intersects with Māori economy that brings together a current context to the way colonization impacts the modern practices of Māori self-determination.

People
Native Nations
Resource Type
Citation

Native Nations Institute. "Robert Joseph: History of Maori Governance and Self-Determination.” Leading Native Nations, Native Nations Institute, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, December, 2017

Transcript available upon request. Please email: nni@email.arizona.edu

Stephen Roe Lewis: Effective Tribal Leadership for Change

Producer
Native Nations Institute
Year

Stephen Roe Lewis has been serving two terms as the Governor of the Gila River Indian Community. He follows a strong tradition and family legacy of leadership for the Akimel O’otham and Pee-Posh people in this desert riparian region of Arizona. Governor Lewis has worked on numerous political campaigns and organizing projects throughout Indian Country including Native voter organizing and Native voter protection in 2002 and selected as an Arizona delegate and Co-Chairing the Native American Caucus for the 2012 Democratic National Convention in Charlotte, North Carolina. As well as, serving on the Board of Directors for the Native American Rights Fund (NARF), the Executive Board for the National Indian Gaming Association (NIGA) and the Board of Trustees for the Heard Museum of Phoenix. Governor Lewis has wroked with his community to create solutions for resources and education in the Gila River Indian Community. The Management Aquifer Recharge site (MAR-5) project brings together the need for access to water while restoring the return of the Community's riparian area which is vital for farming and the return of wildlife to the Community, and developed a new eductaion reviatlze program to construct a Bureau of Indian Education replacement school and then lease that school back to the federal government. His longstanding work to create a strong Native Nation for the Gila River Inidan Community and making tribal eaderhsip work for change is told in this interview with Native Nations Institute. 

Resource Type
Citation

Native Nations Institute. "Stephen Roe Lewis: Effective Tribal Leadership for Change," Leading Native Nations, Native Nations Institute, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ. January 14, 2020

Transcript available upon request. Please email: nni@email.arizona.edu

Governor Stephen Roe Lewis Distinguished Tribal Leader Lecture

Producer
Native Nations Institute
Year

Governor Stephen Roe Lewis of the Gila River Indian Community visited the University of Arizona to speak at January in Tucson: Distinguished Tribal Leader Lecture sponsored by the Native Nations Institute and held at the Indigenous Peoples Law & Policy program at James E. Rogers College of Law. In the tradition of his family legacy of leadership for the Akimel O’otham and Pee-Posh people of this desert riparian region of Arizona, Governor Lewis has been a steady leader in the Tribal Government of the Gila River Indian Community through several successful initiatives centered around revitalization of the Gila River and new Gila River Indian Community schools. His approach to Native Nation Building is exemplified in these examples as he shows careful planning and consideration to creating innovative ideas, strong capable institutional support, and centering cultural match to the outcomes. This dedication to a vision of self-determination by leadership in the Gila River Indian Community as shown by Governor Lewis presents an example to the potential of Native Nation Building.

Transcript available upon request. Please email: nni@email.arizona.edu

Navajo Nation President Jonathan Nez: Native Nation Building for the Navajo Nation

Producer
Native Nations Institute
Year

Navajo Nation President Jonathan Nez visited the University of Arizona and gave his views on making governance work for people in he Navajo Nation.  In this brief interview with NNI the President offered his thoughts on Native Nation Building and the way it is utilized for the Navajo nation as well as his insight on making governance happen without a written constitution.

Native Nations
Resource Type
Citation

Native Nations Institute. "Navajo Nation President Jonathan Nez: Native Nation Building for the Navajo Nation.” Leading Native Nations, Native Nations Institute, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, December 3, 2019

Transcript available upon request. Please email: nni@email.arizona.edu

Navajo Nation President Jonathan Nez Distinguished Tribal Leaders Lecture

Producer
Native Nations Institute
Year

The Indigenous Peoples Law and Policy Program hosted the Distinguished Tribal Leaders Lecture at the University of Arizona James E Rogers College of Law featuring the recently elected Navajo Nation President Jonathan Nez. The president gave his views on working for a Native Nation and making governance work for people in he Navajo Nation. He was joined by Miss Navajo Nation 2019 Shaandiin Parrish and Deputy Chief of Staff Milton Bluehouse Jr. who also gave their thoughts about serving their Native Nation.

Native Nations
Resource Type
Citation

Native Nations Institute. "Navajo Nation President Jonathan Nez Distinguished Tribal Leaders Lecture," Indigenous Peoples Law and Policy Program, University of Arizona. Tucson, Arizona. December 3, 2019

Transcript available upon request. Please email: nni@email.arizona.edu

Diane Enos: Endurance through Native Leadership

Producer
Native Nations Institute
Year

Diane Enos is an Attorney, Councilwoman & Former President of Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community. She has also served as Vice President of the Inter-Tribal Council of Arizona, Chairwoman of the Arizona Indian Gaming Association, and as a Western Area Delegate to the Tribal Justice Advisory Group, U.S. Department of Justice.

Diane draws from decades of service in tribal government, sharing key insights related to the challenges that Native peoples face in developing effective partnerships with local governments. She also discusses her path toward leading her Nation as a Native two-spirit woman.

In this interview, Diane offers her years of perspective an experience on what it means to engage and govern through Native leadership. Especially in the environment of her tribe that is constantly navigating their indigenous governance within areas of non-Native institutions and residencies.

People
Resource Type
Citation

Native Nations Institute. "Diane Enos: Endurance through Native Leadership.” Leading Native Nations, Native Nations Institute, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, January 15, 2019

Transcript available upon request. Please email: nni@email.arizona.edu

Herminia Frias: Native Women in Governance

Producer
Native Nations Institute
Year

Herminia “Minnie” Frias, Councilwoman, Pascua Yaqui Tribal Council. Councilwoman Frias shares her journey of being a Native woman leader, drawing from her experience in serving on her Nation’s Tribal Council both as a Chairwoman, and as a Council Member. Frias was the youngest person and first woman to be elected as Tribal Chair of the Pascua Yaqui Tribe. 

In addition to her tenure in Tribal government, she also ran the non-profit Native Images, Inc., serving as Executive Director; and has served as an International Advisory Council Member for Native Nations Institute, and a Bush Foundation Partnership Manager. Herminia carries a wealth of knowledge in the area of Native Nation Building but also adds valuable experience as a leading Native woman in her community, navigating the many facets of indigenous governance that are necessary to create effective leadership. 

This speech was recorded as part of the Native Women in Governance Speaker Series presented by the Native Nations Institute’s Indigenous Governance Program in collaboration with the Indigenous Peoples Law and Policy program at the University of Arizona, James E. Rogers College of Law.

Native Nations
Resource Type
Citation

Native Nations Institute. "Herminia Frias: Native Women in Governance" Native Women In Governance Speaker Series. Tucson, Arizona. January 23, 2019

 

Transcript available upon request. Please email: nni@email.arizona.edu

IWCL Case Study: Membertou First Nation

Producer
Coady International Institute
Year

This is a documentary produced by the Coady International Institute and is part of their "Indigenous Women in Community Leadership" series. The video is described on their website as follows:

"The community of Membertou has come a long way to be crowned the "jewel of Cape Breton". Once a small and thriving reserve in the heart of Sydney -- a city perched on the northeast shore of Cape Breton Island -- it was forcibly relocated from its premium lands on the harbour in the 1920s. Remnants of this event have shaped the community for most of the 20th century and even fifteen years ago the average resident of Sydney would not have had a reason to set foot in Membertou.

Today however, it is a key economic driver of the region, providing 700 jobs in peak season -- close to half of them non-Aboriginal people -- and grossing annual revenues of $75 million from Band-owned and operated businesses." 

This case study explores the process of Membertou's transformation from a welfare reserve completely dependent on federal funding, to one of Cape Breton's economic bright spots.

Native Nations
Resource Type
Topics
Citation

 "IWCL Case Study: Membertou First Nation." Coady International Institute. 2011. Documentary. (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z8SrNfDFFEQ&feature=related, accessed July 26, 2023)